Thoughts?

Ground Vs Air Won The US Election

Grass roots campaigns (Ground) was far more effective for Obama than television (Air) for Romney.   

Many political junkies said Ohio would decide the Presidency of the United States.  Many votes in that state are employed by or have family employed by the auto industry.  Obama supported the bailout of one of the largest employers in the United States whereas Romney was against it.   In fact, Romney aired television commercials indicating that automotive jobs would be going to China.   This fear tactic was not only untruthful, misleading, a lie (whatever term you wish to call it), it was insulting to the hard working people of that state.  The result, it backfired on Romney and people voted for the sure bet (the man who supported the bailout).  What can be learned from the air assault (tv commercials) from Romney with respect to the current fights of the cstore channel (contraband, right to sell beer) and the future fights (fat tax, location to sell, etc.)?

There is no more powerful form of advertising than “word of mouth”.

More and more people are relying on referrals from friends and strangers (like, disklike in social media), than they are in listening to sales pitches from manufacturers.  Product and or service reviews by people that are consumers that use the products/services, and are not paid spokespersons are more believable, more genuine (not scripted) and “feel right” in the massive amounts of information that is available out there.   The number one rule (if there is one) in social media is that once you are committed, you need to respond to the feedback from your readers, participants whether good or bad.   Putting consumer research in the open air on public blogs is not only nerve wracking, it is real and exciting.

What are the ground assaults that the convenience store industry needs to mobile on.  One, cstores in Canada serve 10 million people a day.  This is an unpaid audience that can be spoken to, educated (very quickly), engaged on issues facing the community and the stores that serve them.  Let’s face it, the cstore industry is a natural choice to sell beer – but the beer monopolies want the additional distribution (who wouldn’t) but do not want their profit margins squeezed which would invariably happen when more and more competition that sells beer competes for the consumer purchase.  Beer companies can afford television commercials, the cstore can’t.  Leveraging the strength of the people (voters) coming into the store is the best strategic weapon to strength the business of being convenient and neighbourhood responsive and responsible.   What are your thoughts on getting engaged?